5 ENGLISH IDIOMS ABOUT ILL HEALTH

We present to you the most commonly used idioms in English about feelings and emotions. This article introduces five idioms about ill health.

This article introduces five idioms about ill health. You will find an explanation of each idiom, as well as examples to illustrate its meaning. By using idioms, you can make your English speech more interesting.

 

BLUE

sad

  1. Rachel seems pretty unhappy these days. I wonder why she’s feeling blue.
  2. Let’s try to cheer up the children. They’ve been pretty blue since their pet dog died.

Synonyms: down in the dumps; down in the mouth

 

BURNED OUT

lacking enthusiasm due to overexposure or too much of the same thing; completely used up; worn out

  1. Scott just couldn’t face another semester studying chemistry. He had taken so many chemistry classes
    that he was burned out.
  2. Betty got burned out spending so much time volunteering at the hospital. She decided she needed a vacation.

The expression suggests a device like a light bulb that burns out (stops shining) when all of its energy is used up.

 

DOWN AND OUT

poor

  1. Years ago Sam was down and out. He had no job and no money.
  2. This is a shelter for the down and out of the city. The homeless can come here for a hot meal and a place to sleep at night.

The expression suggests the idea of being down at the bottom of society and out of luck.

 

GO TO THE DOGS

to fall into disrepair; to deteriorate

  1. This restaurant used to be so fashionable and classy, but it has gone to the dogs since it changed management.
  2. This neighborhood is going to the dogs – the homeowners aren’t keeping their houses or their yards in good repair. It’s a shame.

Synonyms: go to pot / seed

 

UNDER THE WEATHER

unwell; ill

  1. John has not been looking very well these days. He’s under the weather.
  2. The children and I have had so many colds this winter. The whole family has been under the weather
    for weeks.

Antonym: in the pink

Whereas in the pink can be applied to people, animals, or machines, under the weather is applied only to people or animals.

 

After the book «In the Loop: A Reference Guide to American English Idioms»

 

Enjoy and SkypeYourEnglish!